History

Sigma Phi Delta is an international social fraternity of engineers founded at the University of Southern California April 11, 1924. Restricted to engineering students, it is therefore a professional social fraternity. It is a relatively young fraternity and thus a small fraternity insofar as number of chapters and total membership is concerned. Nevertheless, it is well organized, and its chapters are carefully supervised by the national officers and by faculty and alumni advisors.

Sigma Phi Delta was organized to promote the advancement of the engineering profession and of engineering education, to encourage excellence in scholarship, and to develop in its members the highest ideals of virtuous manhood, good citizenship, and brotherhood.

With 94 years of involvement in the USC community we have created strong connections with the school and other organizations on campus. Our traditions center around engineering and in turn they foster the advancement of the engineering profession.

Declaration of Principles and Objects

From time to time the Fraternity, or Greek, system is called upon to set forth the principles for which it stands. So far, it has been able to offer a satisfactory explanation for its existence. As a part of this system - as a Fraternity of Engineers we insist that whatever our own superficial peculiarities, we exist for a purpose.

We stand steadfast and firm in our belief that we serve as a necessary adjunct to our Colleges and Universities in the training of young engineers. Our Constitution states, without equivocation, that the Object of the Fraternity shall be to promote the advancement of the Engineering Profession; to foster the advancement of Engineering Education; to instill a greater spirit of cooperation among Engineering Students and Organizations; to inculcate in its members the highest ideals of virtuous manhood, good Citizenship, obedience to Law, and Brotherhood; and to encourage excellence in scholarship. These objects we endeavor to fulfill in our Laws, in our Ritual, in our conduct and in our relations with others.